YOU DON’T NEED A DIAGNOSIS TO BE STRUGGLING…

By Dawn Carey, Head of In Charley’s Memory, a mental health charity for 11 to 25-year-olds

So many of us have bad days and for the most part we can cope, but for some the bad days do not go away.

You do not need a diagnosis from the doctor to access counselling, and you certainly do not need a diagnosis to prove you are struggling.

“How long will this generation be called the “Covid19 students” – having to prove they are as good as they say, yet not sitting an exam to back them up?”

EVERYONE deserves support if they need it or want it.

The chaos around A-level and GCSE exams of 2020 is just the start. We have not even begun to address the long-term impact.

Over the last two weeks students across the country have been through hell, waiting on results that will impact the rest of their lives.

“With just weeks to go to the start of the new year we have not even begun to look at the long term effect this farce will have on our young people. We need to address this now  before it’s too late.”

To work all year to be told there are not enough “A”s to go around, to lose accommodation because they can’t hold the rooms, losing a place at the university of their choice doing the degree they want, yet now find themselves planning to go to a different university, doing a completely different degree? 

How long will this generation be called the “Covid19 students” – having to prove they are as good as they say, yet not sitting an exam to back them up?

And what about the implications this will have on next year’s students, five months of lost education, oversubscribed university paces, I could go on ………

There are vile comments on social media telling our young people to ‘get over it’, ‘sort themselves out’, ‘they have options’. It’s ironic that only a few months ago we were all talking and sharing #BEKIND

Every day I see young people needing support for many reasons, and now more than ever our services will be required. 

I have seen very little that has looked at the mental health of these students both now and in the future.

We talk about mental health. We all say we should raise awareness and support our young people. But let’s be honest. Mental health services were struggling before this, so please tell me where will this support be coming from?

ICM will endeavor to raise awareness and to be a safe space to come to for counselling. We will continue to work with schools on early intervention. And importantly we will be the voice of the “Covid19 kids”.

With just weeks to go to the start of the new year we have not even begun to look at the long term effect this farce will have on our young people. We need to address this now  before it’s too late.

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