King Arthur‘s tomb dig to unearth secrets of Neolithic Britain – and you can see it!

By Jill Dando News

UK Archaeologists have started digging up a 5,000-year-old tomb linked to the legendary King Arthur.

The University of Manchester hopes their efforts will answer some of the mysteries surrounding the historic site, known as Arthur’s Stone.

Arthur’s Stone is a Neolithic chambered tomb which has never previously been excavated Photo credit English Heritage

Visitors will be able to see the work themselves by pre-booking tours.

The ancient Arthur’s Stone site in Hertfortshire, which is near to the town of Hay-on-Wye along the Welsh-English border, has a Neolithic chambered tomb which has never previously been excavated.

Their work could also shed new light on the legend of King Arthur, the fabled leader of the British who is said to have battled a giant at the site.

The archeologists, working with a team of volunteers from English Heritage, are removing turf to expose and record the sensitive remains.

Manchester Professor Julian Thomas said: “Arthur’s Stone is one of this country’s outstanding prehistoric monuments, set in a breathtaking location – yet it remains poorly understood.

 “Our work seeks to restore it to its rightful place in the story of Neolithic Britain”.

Like many prehistoric monuments in western England and Wales, this tomb has been linked to King Arthur since before the 13th century. According to legend, it was here that Arthur slew a giant who left the impression of his elbows on one of the stones as he fell.

Read more about the history of Arthur’s Stone.

EXCAVATION TO REVEAL THE MYSTERIES OF ARTHUR’S STONE

People can see archaeology in action on pre-booked tours of the historic site.

This July English Heritage visitors to Arthur’s Stone will get a rare glimpse of what lies beneath the Herefordshire landmark.

Expert archaeologists will be joined by a team of volunteers to offer tours and talks throughout the excavations which can be pre-booked by anyone interested in a first look at some of Herefordshire’s rich early archaeology as it is revealed. 

Tours are available from 6-26 July except Thursdays. Tour times: 10:30, 12:30 and 2:30.

Click here to book a tour through Eventbrite

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